Thank A Teacher Campaign

2017 Goshen Community Schools Foundation

Thank A Teacher campaign

Flowers are beginning to bloom, spring break is over and the final countdown begins! As our thoughts turn to summer, let’s take a moment to reflect and celebrate the hard work and dedication of our Goshen teachers!

Ever wonder what to do to show your appreciation for a great teacher?

Here’s an easy win-win solution! Make a contribution to the foundation in honor of your favorite teacher(s). During Teacher Appreciation Week (May 1-5, 2017) we will honor the staff member of your choice with a commemorative card highlighting your words of thanks. School principals will be notified of all staff who receive this special recognition. We will also recognize all honored staff at the Goshen Community School Board meeting on May 22, 2017 and through the local media.

Your donation funds future grants awarded throughout Goshen Community Schools to encourage and support creativity, innovation, and excellence that furthers opportunities for the educational community. Help us recognize the great teachers working throughout Goshen Community Schools!

Click on the link below, and follow the prompts for Thank A Teacher:

http://goshenschoolsfoundation.org/

Forms may be submitted online, or printed from the website.

Thank you to all of the wonderful, dedicated teachers at Goshen Community Schools!

GHS ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 2017

GHS ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 2017                                

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

WORK PERMITS:  When you get a work permit EVERY box needs to be filled out on the Intent to Employ form before we will issue you the work permit.

Seniors:  If you still need to order a cap and gown you can visit their web site at www.highschool.herffjones.com to place an order.  They will also be here on Thursday during the lunch periods.  Cap & Gown delivery day will be on May 2nd during SRT.

GHS is offering an athletic physical exam night for GHS students TOMORROW from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the new urgent care center on Elkhart Rd.  All students interested MUST sign up for an appointment time in advance with Mrs. Schrock in the GHS athletic office and pay $20 in advance.  If you cannot pay the $20, please see Mr. Kissinger for scholarship opportunities.  This is a great opportunity to complete your physical exam for the 2017-18 school year.

This semester’s blood drive will be Friday, April 21st and sign-ups are happening now in social studies classes.  See Mrs. Clark in room 2280 if you have any questions.

Seniors:  The Carol Rhinehart Scholarship is open to any student that is pursuing a college degree in the medical field (nursing, pharmacy, pre-med, etc).  It is due April 30th and as of now, they haven’t received any applications from local schools.  They have $2500 to give away and no one to give it to!  Please stop in guidance, pick up an application and get it sent in if you plan on furthering your education in the medical field.

Attention Students and Staff:  Key Club is collecting travel-sized soap, shampoo and conditioner for families at Riley Hospital.  If you traveled over Spring Break and have leftover personal items, you may bring them to the guidance office THIS WEEK to be donated.

Elkah DeVoe has been identified by panels of creative professionals as one of the most talented young artists and writers in the nation.  This year, more than 330,000 works of art and writing were submitted.  Only the top .5% were recognized at the national gold medal level.  Elkah DeVoe won a Gold Medal in the Drawing & Illustration category which was titled “Resilient People.”  Her piece will be sent to New York City to be on display until the end of June.  She is the only gold medal student this year at GHS whose actual art work will be shipped to New York.  Her piece of art will be on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Congratulations Elkah!

The guidance office has received new scholarships.  Please stop in for application information!

  • The Horatio Alger Career & Technical Scholarship
  • The Student Education Assistance Award

The Ultimate Frisbee Club meets after school on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:45-5:00 p.m. on the administration field.  If you’re interested in learning how to play the sport of Ultimate Frisbee, you can pick up your required paperwork from Mr. Snyder in the choir office, Mr. Brubaker or from Lucas Kauffman.  The paperwork should be turned in to Lucas Kauffman the first time you attend.

Seniors who still haven’t filed the FAFSA:  Indiana has announced that the state’s March 10th FAFSA deadline will be extended until April 15th this year!  The process for families became more complicated this year due to a glitch in the IRS retrieval tool.  Students and their families can now go back in to file the FAFSA if they have not done so, or go back in if the tax import tool did not work for them.  Take advantage of this second chance to possibly qualify for funds from the State and/or Federal government for college!  Don’t miss this new deadline!

It’s time for the annual GHS Prom Dress Drive!  This purpose of this drive is to provide free dresses for students who want to go to the prom but may be in financial need.  We have several dresses in various styles and sizes to choose from.  If you are in need of a prom dress or if you wish to donate a gently used dress, please contact Mrs. Hershberger or Mrs. Shakley.  You may also ask your SRT teacher for more information.

Homework help is available every Tuesday and Thursday in the media center from 3:45-5:00 p.m.  A bus will be available around 5:20 p.m. if you need a ride home.  It will pick you up at door M.  This is a great opportunity if you just need a little extra time or even just a quiet place to do your homework at the end of the day.

Please stop by the commons area (either by the cafeteria or outside the main office) during lunch if you are interested is speaking to the following:

  • 4/12   Elkhart County Sheriff’s Department
  • 4/19   Army National Guard
  • 4/21   Ace’s Student Exchange Program

 

MEETINGS DURING SRT:

There will be a call meeting on the upper deck of the main gym for anyone interested in cheerleading TODAY during the 2nd session of SRT.  If you are unable to make the meeting, please contact Coach Eckelbarger or Coach Sloan.

All girls interested in playing soccer next fall have a callout meeting TODAY during the 2nd session of SRT in the teacher’s lounge by the cafeteria (room 4010).  If you cannot make the meeting please come see Coach Graber sometime today to pick up spring and summer information.

 

SPORTS SCORES:

The boys varsity baseball team improved to 5-0 with a 14-4 ten run rule victory over Mishawaka. Austin Cain improved to 2-0 on the mound throwing five innings, striking out two and walking none.  Chase Knoblock threw a scoreless inning of relief.  Offensively, Trenton Scott hit his 3rd homer in of the year, Charlie Collins had three hits and four RBI’s and Jacob Haimes had three singles.  Chase Knoblock reached base in all four at bats with two HBP’s, a walk and a single.

The boys varsity golf team was led by Peyton Cripe who shot a 44.  The JV team was led by freshman Ben Schneider who fired a 53.

Mishawaka handed the boys JV baseball team their first loss of the season.  After falling behind 5-0, the RedHawks battled back to take an 8-7 lead heading into the 7th inning, but the comeback ultimately fell short as the RedHawks gave up two runs in the last inning losing 9-8. The RedHawks offense was led by Eric Newell who had four hits and two RBIs.  Jack Immel had three doubles and two RBIs as well.  Joseph Good pitched five strong innings for the RedHawks in relief, but was handed the loss.

 

IN SPORTS ACTION TODAY:

The boys JV and varsity golf teams will compete at Maplecrest against Memorial, Lakeland and West Noble at 4:30 p.m.

The boys varsity baseball team will play at Jimtown at 5:00 p.m.

The boys JV baseball team will host Jimtown at 5:00 p.m.

The girls varsity softball team will host Bethany at 5:00 p.m.

The girls JV and varsity track and field teams will compete at Warsaw against Northridge and Warsaw at 5:30 p.m.

Go RedHawks!

GHS Gold Medalist/Art & Writing Award

Gold Medalist-Scholastic Art & Writing Awards of 2017

Goshen Community Schools is pleased to announce that Elkah DeVoe has won a Gold Medal in the Drawing & Illustration category, with her piece entitled “Resilient People.”  A Goshen High School junior, Elkah DeVoe has been identified by panels of creative professionals as one of the most talented young artists and writers in the nation! This year, more than 330,000 works of art and writing were submitted, and only the top .5% were recognized at the national gold medal level. Her piece will be sent to New York City to be on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until the end of June.  She is the only gold medal student at GHS this year whose actual art work will be shipped to New York.

As Goshen High School Art teachers, we are very proud of Elkah. Please join us in congratulating her for this outstanding achievement!

Cindy Cooper, Thomas Zuber, Lindi Cranston, Betsy Poling, Susan Long

GHS ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR MONDAY, APRIL 10, 2017

GHS ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR MONDAY, APRIL 10, 2017                                 

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Welcome back!

WORK PERMITS:  When you get a work permit EVERY box needs to be filled out on the Intent to Employ form before we will issue you the work permit.

Seniors:  If you still need to order a cap and gown you can visit their web site at www.highschool.herffjones.com to place an order.  They will also be here on Thursday during the lunch periods.  Cap & Gown delivery day will be on May 2nd during SRT.

GHS is offering an athletic physical exam night for GHS students on Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the new urgent care center on Elkhart Rd.  All students interested MUST sign up for an appointment time in advance with Mrs. Schrock in the GHS athletic office and pay $20 in advance.  If you cannot pay the $20, please see Mr. Kissinger for scholarship opportunities.  This is a great opportunity to complete your physical exam for the 2017-18 school year.

This semester’s blood drive will be Friday, April 21st and sign-ups are happening now in social studies classes.  See Mrs. Clark in room 2280 if you have any questions.

Attention Students and Staff:  Key Club is collecting travel-sized soap, shampoo and conditioner for families at Riley Hospital.  If you traveled over Spring Break and have leftover personal items, you may bring them to the guidance office through April 13th to be donated.

The guidance office has received new scholarships.  Please stop in for application information!

  • The Horatio Alger Career & Technical Scholarship
  • The Student Education Assistance Award

The Ultimate Frisbee Club meets after school on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:45-5:00 p.m. on the administration field.  If you’re interested in learning how to play the sport of Ultimate Frisbee, you can pick up your required paperwork from Mr. Snyder in the choir office, Mr. Brubaker or from Lucas Kauffman.  The paperwork should be turned in to Lucas Kauffman the first time you attend.

Seniors who still haven’t filed the FAFSA:  Indiana has announced that the state’s March 10th FAFSA deadline will be extended until April 15th this year!  The process for families became more complicated this year due to a glitch in the IRS retrieval tool.  Students and their families can now go back in to file the FAFSA if they have not done so, or go back in if the tax import tool did not work for them.  Take advantage of this second chance to possibly qualify for funds from the State and/or Federal government for college!  Don’t miss this new deadline!

It’s time for the annual GHS Prom Dress Drive!  This purpose of this drive is to provide free dresses for students who want to go to the prom but may be in financial need.  We have several dresses in various styles and sizes to choose from.  If you are in need of a prom dress or if you wish to donate a gently used dress, please contact Mrs. Hershberger or Mrs. Shakley.  You may also ask your SRT teacher for more information.

Homework help is available every Tuesday and Thursday in the media center from 3:45-5:00 p.m.  A bus will be available around 5:20 p.m. if you need a ride home.  It will pick you up at door M.  This is a great opportunity if you just need a little extra time or even just a quiet place to do your homework at the end of the day.

Please stop by the commons area (either by the cafeteria or outside the main office) during lunch if you are interested is speaking to the following:

  • 4/12     Elkhart County Sheriff’s Department
  • 4/21     Ace’s Student Exchange Program
  • TBA    Army National Guard

 

MEETINGS DURING SRT:

There will be a call meeting on the upper deck of the main gym for anyone interested in cheerleading TOMORROW during the 2nd session of SRT.  If you are unable to make the meeting, please contact Coach Eckelbarger or Coach Sloan.

 

SPORTS SCORES:

 

IN SPORTS ACTION TODAY:

The boys JV and varsity baseball teams will host Mishawaka at 5:00 p.m.

The boys JV and varsity golf teams will play against Northridge and Fairfield at 5:00 p.m. @ Meadow Valley.

Good luck gentlemen!

Merit Students Complete Project at LoveWay

High school students from Merit Learning Center in Goshen have been working on a service-learning project at LoveWay since September of 2016. On Tuesday the 11th of April they will install the grand finale of their service-learning project, four landscapes for LoveWay’s sensory horseback riding trail. On Wednesday students and faculty will be coming back to LoveWay to see the trail in use as LoveWay rider’s experience the updates for the first time.

When the weather was agreeable, the students would come and work once a month on cleaning the trail and laying mulch. When the weather turned colder they began working on large art projects, essentially mini-environments or landscapes that will be installed along the trail. LoveWay’s sensory trail is used as part of their therapeutic riding classes for youths with special needs. The idea behind the trail is to engage the students’ senses as they guide their horse along the quarter mile path. The students love the experience and so do the horses.

Two groups of students will be coming out on Tuesday the 11th to install the project, one beginning at 9 am and the other at 1 pm. Then on Wednesday Merit administrators and a smaller group of students will be there as well. This has been a great opportunity to see high school-aged students empowering younger individuals with special needs; impacting both groups of people.

Nice job, Merit Learning Center students and staff!!

Field Studies, Turtle Hospitals and Group Photos

See photos of the our day here.

Today is beautiful yet again, however we have a very nice breeze which keeps the heat down a little bit.  I’m a bit nervous to even admit that considering weather reports back home suggest snow today for Goshen.  To make all of you feel a bit better I will let you know about the amazing scent that permeates the air here.  As Dylan Steury has told his mom, Michele Fanfair Steury, “You know you are in the Keys when you smell that!”  The sea grass that decomposes along the edge of the sea wall causes the most “awesome” smell of methane you can imagine.  Some days it’s not very noticeable however today because of the wind working sea side is pretty stinky.  The other day I saw a T-shirt that said, “You smell like low tide!”  Quite appropriate for down here. Despite the smell, and honestly it’s not that bad most of the time, working here is amazing.

Yesterday the students worked on their field studies which will be presented today, Thursday, at 4:00pm.  It’s crunch time as all work needs to be completed before we leave Friday morning.  Some have been keeping up, but there are always some procrastinators.  Shocking I’m sure! :)

Second year students spent the day at the Coral Reef Restoration project in Key Largo with Alex Neufeld, a GHS Alumni.  I haven’t had the chance to talk to anyone about their experience up there, but hope to later today.

The chaperones and kids went out to John Pennekamp to experience the reef.  It was pretty amazing seeing the more colorful fish and coral that lives out there compared to that living off of the resort.  Because the resort water environment is grassy and muddy, the fish that live there tend to be less colorful so they can blend in.  It’s been a great learning experience.

The afternoon was filled with trips to The Turtle Hospital in Marathon.  The place is amazing.  We learned there are 7 species of sea turtles and that 5 live in this area.  At the time of our visit there were only 4 there.  Green, Loggerhead, Hawksbill, and Kemps Ridley.  The Leatherback are not typical patients of the hospital.

Turtle patients come to the hospital when they get calls from people like you and me who have found them stranded or sick.  You can tell a turtle is sick if they are floating on the water or have a lot of barnacles on their shells.  Some amount of barnacles is common, but having a lot means they are not swimming and diving much.  Those that find and call in the turtle rescue get to name it.  Hence the really odd names they have there:  Smelly cat, Little Fat Briana, George (which is a girl), Poppy, Tippy, Chuck Norris, Franco, Bubble Butt.  This list goes on as there are 47 turtles currently residing there.  Some are permanent residents while others are there temporarily.

To be released as a turtle you must have at least 3 working flippers and 1 eye.  For a few turtles, this has held them back. Shark bites, boat propellers, and other accidents have led them to multiple amputations and poor eyesight. Without flippers they can’t dive and swim.  Another reason that a sea turtle cannot dive is if they have “bubble butt syndrome” which is what happens with a turtle gets hit by a boat or something else which causes a deformity in their shell.  The syndrome was named after “Bubble Butt”, who is a permanent resident at the hospital.  You can immediately tell a turtle has this because they cannot dive and they have a very conspicuous lump on their shell sticking out of the water.  These turtles also have air trapped in their muscles resulting from their impact with the boats.  The hospital has tried many ways to release them of this air, but have not been successful.

Last night we had yet another amazing meal of hamburgers, brats, and numerous salads.  I’ve been so impressed by the meals prepared here.  We are very blessed to have such an abundance of food.  After the meal we had the annual group photo.  Because we had such a large group this year, 163 people, we took a few smaller group photos as well as the big one.  Below you can see us in our lavender shirts.

All of us!

Marine Biology Students

Marine Biology Staff

Chaperones and kids

Island Grill Videos

Sorry for delay with the videos from Tuesday night’s Island Grill meal.  As I said yesterday, the Coconut Cowboys really know how to get a party going and to encourage the students to dance and sing along with them. The highlight of the evening was the mash up of Beatles songs with Riley Bove.  Also enjoy the entertainment of the backup singers and Sweet Home Alabama.

 

Pennekamp, Coconut Cowboys and The Beatles

See photos of the day here.

Tuesday the students and some staff and parents went to John Pennekamp for a snorkeling excursion.  This is a favorite for many as its a chance to see some larger and more brightly colored marine life than what is visible outside of our resort.  Pennekamp is a roughly an hour from the resort depending on traffic, so they headed out early.  For those of us staying back at the resort it was a very quiet day.

After the snorkeling trip they had a short amount of beach time and then time to get cleaned up for the Island Grill.  Every year the restaurant closes down for the group meal.  They serve an assortment of items such as Mahi, chicken, burgers and vegetarian options.  This year they were also entertained by a band called the Coconut Cowboys.  Reports say they were pretty amazing and had a great knack for getting students to sing with them.  I will be posting video of this later!

The busses arrived back at the resort around 8:30 just in time to roast marshmallows and have s’mores to end a pretty great day!

Today the remainder of the adults and kids will be heading to Pennekamp so I have to cut this short.  Look for the videos of the dinner later tonight.

 

 

Bights that sting, puke fests and prom proposals

You can see photos from our day here.

Yesterday by far was the one of the most interesting days.  It started off fairly normal with students heading off to their respective habitat studies, and excursions, but one by one, the stories starting coming in.

During the afternoon the 2nd year students took the pontoon to a location called Triton Flats.  There assignment was, according to Kyle Taft, “To collect biodiversity and quadrant data. While there we also found a sea hair, we named it Papa Shrek.  It looks like a large black slug with wing like fins on the back of it.”  In previous years Kyle said they found another that they had named Shrek.  As you can see on the link they do look a bit like Shrek!

Apparently this black slug like creature was a favorite of Sara Taft, something known by Camden Lacy.  He used it as inspiration to ask her to prom while out on the flats.  Rumor has it she said yes.  I’m sure it will be prom proposal that people will remember for a while.

Also during the afternoon a group headed out to a location called “the bight”, pronounced “bite”.  Among those on the trip were Christina Haimes and Pete Biddle. They were out snorkeling the area and were not seeing much.  According to Haimes, “We thought we would head to the mangroves were we have typically seen better marine life.”  So off the two of the went.  Soon they found themselves in very shallow water, about a foot deep, that was mostly sediment and grass.  What they didn’t notice right away was that something was living there, a lot of somethings.

“We floated into this area that was really shallow and as I looked down I quickly realized that it was home to jellyfish. A lot of them.  I tried to stay calm and not disturb them by just moving my hands and flippers just a little in attempt to get out of there.  Pete was trying to do the same thing.  Stay on the surface and move as little as possible.  Unfortunately it wasn’t enough because we were both stung quite a few times.  My biggest fear while snorkeling has been to be stung by a jellyfish.  I can tell you now that it hurts, a lot.” Biddle had a body suit on so he didn’t get the welts caused by the jelly fish stings.  Haimes had quite a few all over her legs about the size of baseballs.  By the evening and after using cortisone cream, she was feeling better.

And just because I know you are all thinking it, although Haimes had offers, she didn’t allow anyone to pee on her stings.  “That is a myth!”, she exclaimed.  :)

The evening seemed to be fairly relaxing for some of us.  The place was quiet as many were out on the second night fishing excursion.  The first night went really well, lots of fish caught, quiet seas, only one got sick.  What a perfect time THEY had.  As I was heading to breakfast I began to hear the stories of a not so perfect night.

WARNING: Don’t read further if you are prone to sympathetic vomiting!

They are calling it a “puke fest”.  Forty-two passengers were aboard and only 8 managed not to be sick.  It started in the front of the boat when someone “let it fly”, spraying those down wind.  (I imagine it was something out of a movie.)  From there on they started dropping like flies.  The conditions were not ideal.  High waves and rough seas kept them from going out as far as the previous night.  The boat was rocking and even though they took precautions, it wasn’t helping.  Sara Holsopple said, “They warned us that it was rough and people were going to puke. Eventually I just closed my eyes and leaned forward.  It helped.”

Dani Smith was perhaps the worst off.  ” I just hung over the side of the boat until it stopped. (which was hours) Then I tried to lay down and just get through it.”  Some didn’t get sick but felt nauseas the majority of the time.  You could find people laying down wherever they could squeeze.  One student was sleeping on a bench and fell off.  “I heard a thud, ” said Josh Haimes, ” and he was down.”

Those that didn’t get sick actually caught quite a lot of fish.  I believe we have 27 lbs in total.The fish kept will be filleted and eaten on the last night we are here along with all of our other left overs.

For those of us that didn’t go, well, be glad you didn’t.  For those that did, I hope you have a better time at John Pennekamp snorkeling today and that the seas are calmer.  And if you do feel sick, jump out first please!

 

 

 

GHS IB Student Featured in HIBS Newsletter

Goshen High School is pleased to announce that one of their students, senior Charlie Collins, had a full-page story featured in the Newsletter of HIBS-Hoosier Association of IB World Schools. Charlie, who is also a varsity football and baseball player for GHS, is an IB diploma candidate on track to graduate this spring. His article reported on the collaboration of IB students from GHS and from Flint Southwestern Classical Academy, of Flint MI.

Click on the link below to read the article:

Vol.2 – Issue 3 – HIBS Newsletter

Welcoming the students from Flint (on the left, holding the sign).

#19, entering Foreman Field.

Again, #19. (This picture is from a previous year.) Charlie is in his last athletic season as a RedHawk.

Thank you, Charlie, for representing GHS so well, in both the classroom and on the athletic fields. Good luck next year!

We Choose Public Schools

Join us as we highlight the best in public education. Today, the Indiana State Teachers Association (ISTA) launched a statewide campaign to support public schools. Click on the link below to view videos, read blogs, stand up for public schools, and share your story:

https://www.ista-in.org/ichoosepublicschools

More than 90 percent of Hoosier families send their children to public schools. It’s time to recognize that public education offers a well-rounded education with access to the arts, music and physical education, opens its doors to students from every background, provides special education programs, and brings together the community.

ISTA wants to hear from educators, parents, students, and public education advocates on why they choose public schools.

Please visit IChoosePublicSchools.org to share your story. Share the videos on social media using the hashtag #IChoosePublicSchools.

Good of Goshen Memory-Max Mault/Goshen Bands

This is the time of year when students have the opportunity to join band or orchestra, and learn to play an instrument. Students meet with the directors to try a few instruments and consider what might work for them. Musical instruments are available for students to rent or purchase; or in some cases, students may borrow school-owned instruments.

 
To view the video about long-time band director, Max Mault, click on the link below:

http://goodofgoshen.com/project/max-mault-the-good-of-goshen/

Music education is an integral part of a well-rounded education, and at Goshen Community Schools, the music department has a rich history of outstanding teachers and expectations for excellence. The benefits of music education at Goshen may include any or all of the following:

1. Musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds.

2. A mastery of memorization: Even when performing with sheet music, student musicians are constantly using their memory to perform. The skill of memorization can serve students well in education and beyond.

3. Students learn to improve their work: Learning music promotes craftsmanship, and students learn to want to create good work instead of mediocre work. This desire can be applied to all subjects of study.

4. Increased coordination: Students who practice with musical instruments can improve their hand-eye coordination. Just like playing sports, children can develop motor skills when playing music.

5. A sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a challenging, but achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievement.

6. Kids stay engaged in school: An enjoyable subject like music can keep kids interested and engaged in school. Student musicians are likely to stay in school to achieve in other subjects.

7. Success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well.

8. Emotional development: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.

9. Students learn pattern recognition: Children can develop their math and pattern-recognition skills with the help of musical education. Playing music offers repetition in a fun format.

10. Better SAT scores: Students who have experience with music performance or appreciation score higher on the SAT. One report indicates 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math for students in music appreciation courses.

11. Fine-tuned auditory skills: Musicians can better detect meaningful, information-bearing elements in sounds, like the emotional meaning in a baby’s cry. Students who practice music can have better auditory attention, and pick out predictable patterns from surrounding noise.

12. Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination.

13. Music can be relaxing: Students can fight stress by learning to play music. Soothing music is especially helpful in helping kids relax.

14. Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument.

15. Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future.

16. Development in creative thinking: Kids who study the arts can learn to think creatively. This kind of education can help them solve problems by thinking outside the box and realizing that there may be more than one right answer.

17. Music can develop spatial intelligence: Students who study music can improve the development of spatial intelligence, which allows them to perceive the world accurately and form mental pictures. Spatial intelligence is helpful for advanced mathematics and more.

18. Kids can learn teamwork: Many musical education programs require teamwork as part of a band or orchestra. In these groups, students will learn how to work together and build camaraderie.

19. Responsible risk-taking: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential.

20. Better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

Source: National Association for Music Education

Sun loving, Churches and Night Fishing

You can view photos from our day here.

Sunday showed up just a beautiful as all the other, slightly overcast which was welcome by those who chose to not wear sunscreen the previous day.  Yesterday I mentioned that there hadn’t been too many cases of sunburn.  Well, that’s not the case now.  A few are worshipping the sun gods a bit too much and keeping our good doctor on site, Christina Haimes, fairly busy.

The students started work on their habitat studies yesterday with an early seminar. After which, if they wanted, could attend church or mass at the local Baptist and Catholic churches who welcome us each year.  Apparently we double their size upon arrival.  Joel Holsopple and family attended the Layton Baptist Church where they found it to be very welcoming and were even invited to a lunch afterwards. The church is attended over by Pastor Robby.

On a daily basis marine life is found around the resort and at the GC facility.  Yesterday a little orange sea horse was found and put in the temporary viewing area.  The GC facility has a tank that is filled with ocean water and aerated to ensure preservation of the life that temporarily lives in the tank.  Specimens, such as star fish, puffer fish, and now sea horses, are brought in for observation and then released after a day or so.

Because of the size of our group, Night Fishing and John Pennekamp snorkeling is divided into two groups.  Last night the first night fishing group went out and apparently had a great time.  It never fails that someone gets a bit sick and from what I hear, only one did.  I’m sure those on the boat were happy for that small number!

Many fish were caught, among them a large grouper.  Some had a different experience with the fish.  According to Karly from Northridge, she was hit in the face with a flying fish!  Fortunately no injuries and she was not knocked out of the boat.  ;)  It was a late night for those that went and an early morning.  Hopefully they aren’t all crabby today.

 

 

Seminars, Sea Squirts and Rockin’ Night Life

See our photos from today here.

Each morning is a beautiful and balmy 80 degrees with a slight breeze coming off the water. Walking out of our rooms and not being cold at 8am is such a welcome change from the cold weather back in Goshen.  So far there hasn’t been too many with sunburns as the kids have been fully informed of the sun’s danger on their Indiana skin!

After being energized through a pancake breakfast, the students set off for an introductory seminar on the marine environment.  Claire Penner and Ariana Perez Diener said they covered topics on different levels of the ocean, waves and tides.  They learned about the physical characteristics of sea water and how temperature and wind affect it.  They also learned about the affects of the sun and moon with the tides.

Afterwards they went to the quarry that some students went to the previous day.  They saw sea squirts, described by the girls as, “reddish orange and you can squish them and they spray water.”

After lunch the students attended two more seminars on algae and water quality.  Seminars are held at the Goshen College facility across the street about a 10 minute walk from the resort.  Students road out on the pontoon during the seminar.  Others out for leisure, took kayaks through the channels looking for exercise and marine life.  Rick and Griffin Hetler found the tides against them going out and then fighting again as they came back.  They said it was quite a work out!

During their leisure time you can find students, lounging on hammocks, throwing frisbees and baseballs, swimming in the pool, kayaking or paddle boarding.

That evening we had our first common meal right out in front of the resort.  We dined on grilled chicken, baked potatoes, black bean salsa, asian salad and cookies. We eat VERY VERY WELL!  The kids are working hard all day long and refuel at each of our meals.

When it began to get dark, some of the groups were able to go on an excursion to the rocky coastal line.  When the tides go out, many marine life cling to the coastal edge until the tide comes back in.  It’s the perfect time to take a flash light, gloves and some shoes for some exploring.  Many found sea urchins, crabs, and sea cucumber. Other groups will be heading out on different nights.

Everyday has been an adventure for everyone.  Can’t wait to see what tomorrow brings!

Grass, Mud and Chickens

See photos from Day 2 of our trip here.

Friday we all woke early to have the first meal with our eating units.  Everyone is assigned to a group that meets for meals, bookwork check-in and excursions. The groups have a mixture of students, staff, chaperones and kids which allows for bonding with people that you wouldn’t normally have opportunity.  The food is plentiful and well prepared by the families living in the unit that serves it.  Everyone is required to pitch in for cleanup!

After breakfast and daily announcements, the students set off on their first full day of marine study. First year students spent their day at the grassy mud flats on the pier outside the resort and a quarry roughly 15 minutes away.

The grassy mud flats were described by Anna Paetkau.

“It’s important to shuffle when you aren’t snorkeling so you don’t step on marine life hidden in the ocean floor, like sting rays.  We snorkeled around, diving down to find shells.  We found a lobster family under a rock. Some of us saw sting rays, small sharks and barracuda.  We also saw some fire coral, sponge and a school of small fish which we tried to catch but they are so fast.”

After lunch they went to the local quarry, where according to Anna,

“It was important to jump in and away so you don’t disturb the upside down jelly fish that live near the edges.   We swam around the edges where the rock wall and mangroves are looking for lIfe inside the mangroves. It was murky and mostly full of jelly fish. On the wall you could see sea worms, a little algae, and anemones.  We also swam across to the other side of quarry to see comb jelly fish.”

Second year students studied quadrants.  Trey Santiago of Northridge High School said,

“We took a quadrant made of PVC pipe that is 1 meter x 1 meter and threw it into the water.  Then we would tell those on the pier what we found within the quadrants to record it.  I saw some algae, fish and some sponge.”

The IB Art students spent the day, “Traveling to Key West stopping along the way at various locations to find inspiring things in nature [to create drawings for later],” said Dani Smith.

Later that evening we all traveled to Key West which is about an hour and half from Layton.  The students were able to see and experience the interesting and colorful life that is Key West.  Dani’s favorite part was the pier at Mallory Square where the local artists come out at night.  The sword swallower was a favorite of Dani’s.  Trey enjoyed Mallory Square as well and liked how the local architecture was incorporated into nature.  However he felt the homes were to crowded and wouldn’t want to live there!

One of the odd things you will see in Key West are the many chickens and roosters roaming the streets, affectionately called “gypsy chickens” by the locals. Walking around you will see little families of chickens, rosters and chicks nesting in gutters and other small spaces.  They have gotten used to people and wander in and out of open restaurants.  Check out this article for more information on why the population has grown so large.

The bus arrived back at Lime Tree around 10:45pm just in time for everyone to get to bed for another early morning of marine study!